Book Review: Wizards’ Exile by Colin R Parsons

Hello Everyone.

Today I am coming to you with a book review of Wizards’ Exile by Colin R Parsons. I was sent this book for free in exchange for a review.

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The sky city of Valusha is now ruled by an evil overlord called Jenta-Lor. The former ruler and wizard, Obsidian has gone into exile, and has not been seen for many years.

There’s a weird band of misfits – a boy, an engineer and a wizard who have all been locked away in Skytraz Prison. No one has ever escaped from there – well it is thousands of feet above the earth. All seems hopeless.

But the wizard prisoner Rebus knows the layout of Skytraz Prison, so there just might be a chance to break out and get away. If so, can they find Obsidian, and what dangers are ahead?

Buckle up; there’s Magic, Sky Ships and Dragons in this roller coaster adventure ride. (Goodreads)

I found this book to be a fast paced fantasy, with a loads of different characters. I feel this book would be best marketed towards a younger age, I know I would have loved this story when I was younger.

There were three main characters Rhidian (the engineer), Rebus (the wizard) and Red (the boy). Red was by far my favourite out of the three, he seemed to have the best character arc of the story. He was funny and cheeky and he made me laugh. I felt that Rebus and Rhidian were okay characters, but I preferred Red.

The story has so much going on, a jail break, a ghost ship, pirates, and dragons, in some respects I think there was too much, and some of the focus could have gone into fleshing the story out on just a couple of those story bits, instead of all of them. I did really enjoy it thou.

As I said before it was so fast paced, I read it within 2 days. If you are a fan of fast paced fantasies, then I would highly recommend this for you.

3.5 Stars

Happy Reading.

Thanks Bookworms.

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March Wrap Up

Hello Everyone.

Today I am coming to you with my March Wrap up. I read a total of 9 books, which is pretty decent.

Stats

  • 5 stars = 2
  • 4 stars = 4
  • 3 stars = 3
  • 2 stars = 0
  • 1 star = 0

So from the star ratings you can see I had a good reading month. I also read my all time new favourite book, you know a book that just takes over your soul and heart, yeah I read that this month. Now onto the wrap up.

The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar

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This voyage is special. It will change everything…

One September evening in 1785, the merchant Jonah Hancock hears urgent knocking on his front door. One of his captains is waiting eagerly on the step. He has sold Jonah’s ship for what appears to be a mermaid.

As gossip spreads through the docks, coffee shops, parlours and brothels, everyone wants to see Mr Hancock’s marvel. Its arrival spins him out of his ordinary existence and through the doors of high society. At an opulent party, he makes the acquaintance of Angelica Neal, the most desirable woman he has ever laid eyes on… and a courtesan of great accomplishment. This chance meeting will steer both their lives onto a dangerous new course, a journey on which they will learn that priceless things come at the greatest cost…

What will be the cost of their ambitions? And will they be able to escape the destructive power mermaids are said to possess? (Goodreads)

I enjoyed this book, I thought it was well written and the characters were interesting.

4 Stars.

A Curse So Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer

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Fall in love, break the curse.

It once seemed so easy to Prince Rhen, the heir to Emberfall. Cursed by a powerful enchantress to repeat the autumn of his eighteenth year over and over, he knew he could be saved if a girl fell for him. But that was before he learned that at the end of each autumn, he would turn into a vicious beast hell-bent on destruction. That was before he destroyed his castle, his family, and every last shred of hope.

Nothing has ever been easy for Harper Lacy. With her father long gone, her mother dying, and her brother barely holding their family together while constantly underestimating her because of her cerebral palsy, she learned to be tough enough to survive. But when she tries to save someone else on the streets of Washington, DC, she’s instead somehow sucked into Rhen’s cursed world.

Break the curse, save the kingdom.

A prince? A monster? A curse? Harper doesn’t know where she is or what to believe. But as she spends time with Rhen in this enchanted land, she begins to understand what’s at stake. And as Rhen realizes Harper is not just another girl to charm, his hope comes flooding back. But powerful forces are standing against Emberfall . . . and it will take more than a broken curse to save Harper, Rhen, and his people from utter ruin (Goodreads)

I loved this book, I do adore a good Beauty and the Beast retelling.

5 stars.

The Fellowship Of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien

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One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkeness bind them

In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven-smiths, and Sauron, The Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and though he sought it throughout Middle-earth, it remained lost to him. After many ages it fell into the hands of Bilbo Baggins, as told in The Hobbit.

In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose. (Goodreads)

I love this series so much, this is my least favourite of the trilogy, the council scene just takes to long and rambles on.

4 Stars.

Warrior of the Wild by Tricia Levenseller

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How do you kill a god?

As her father’s chosen heir, eighteen-year-old Rasmira has trained her whole life to become a warrior and lead her village. But when her coming-of-age trial is sabotaged and she fails the test, her father banishes her to the monster-filled wilderness with an impossible quest: to win back her honour, she must kill the oppressive god who claims tribute from the villages each year or die trying. (Goodreads)

I really enjoyed this book, it is fast paced and a really fun book to read.

4 Stars.

Daisy Jones and The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

My new favourite book ever.

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Everyone knows Daisy Jones & The Six, but nobody knows the reason behind their split at the absolute height of their popularity . . . until now.

Daisy is a girl coming of age in L.A. in the late sixties, sneaking into clubs on the Sunset Strip, sleeping with rock stars, and dreaming of singing at the Whisky a Go Go. The sex and drugs are thrilling, but it’s the rock and roll she loves most. By the time she’s twenty, her voice is getting noticed, and she has the kind of heedless beauty that makes people do crazy things.

Also getting noticed is The Six, a band led by the brooding Billy Dunne. On the eve of their first tour, his girlfriend Camila finds out she’s pregnant, and with the pressure of impending fatherhood and fame, Billy goes a little wild on the road.

Daisy and Billy cross paths when a producer realizes that the key to supercharged success is to put the two together. What happens next will become the stuff of legend.

Actually can’t even describe my love for this book. Its amazing just go and read it!! Read my mini book review here.

5 Stars.

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter To the World by Ashley Herring Blake

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When a tornado rips through town, twelve-year-old Ivy Aberdeen’s house is destroyed and her family of five is displaced. Ivy feels invisible and ignored in the aftermath of the storm–and what’s worse, her notebook filled with secret drawings of girls holding hands has gone missing.

Mysteriously, Ivy’s drawings begin to reappear in her locker with notes from someone telling her to open up about her identity. Ivy thinks–and hopes–that this someone might be her classmate, another girl for whom Ivy has begun to develop a crush. Will Ivy find the strength and courage to follow her true feelings? (Goodreads)

This was a lovely middle grade book.

3 stars.

A Clash Of Kings by George RR Martin

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A comet the color of blood and flame cuts across the sky. Two great leaders—Lord Eddard Stark and Robert Baratheon—who hold sway over an age of enforced peace are dead, victims of royal treachery. Now, from the ancient citadel of Dragonstone to the forbidding shores of Winterfell, chaos reigns. Six factions struggle for control of a divided land and the Iron Throne of the Seven Kingdoms, preparing to stake their claims through tempest, turmoil, and war.

It is a tale in which brother plots against brother and the dead rise to walk in the night. Here a princess masquerades as an orphan boy; a knight of the mind prepares a poison for a treacherous sorceress; and wild men descend from the Mountains of the Moon to ravage the countryside. Against a backdrop of incest and fratricide, alchemy and murder, victory may go to the men and women possessed of the coldest steel…and the coldest hearts. For when kings clash, the whole land trembles. (Goodreads)

This is my least liked book of this series.

3 Stars.

Graceling by Kristen Cashore

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Katsa has been able to kill a man with her bare hands since she was eight—she’s a Graceling, one of the rare people in her land born with an extreme skill. As niece of the king, she should be able to live a life of privilege, but Graced as she is with killing, she is forced to work as the king’s thug.

She never expects to fall in love with beautiful Prince Po.

She never expects to learn the truth behind her Grace—or the terrible secret that lies hidden far away . . . a secret that could destroy all seven kingdoms with words alone.

With elegant, evocative prose and a cast of unforgettable characters, debut author Kristin Cashore creates a mesmerizing world, a death-defying adventure, and a heart-racing romance that will consume you, hold you captive, and leave you wanting more. (Goodreads)

I really enjoyed this, sometimes I like a romance fantasy!

4 Stars.

Stolen Time by Danielle Rollins

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Seattle, 1913 // Dorothy is trapped. Forced into an engagement to a wealthy man just so she and her mother can live comfortably for the rest of their days, she’ll do anything to escape. Including sneaking away from her wedding and bolting into the woods to disappear.

New Seattle, 2077 // Ash is on a mission. Rescue the professor—his mentor who figured out the secret to time travel—so together they can put things right in their devastated city. But searching for one man means endless jumps through time with no guarantee of success.

When Dorothy collides with Ash, she sees it as her chance to start fresh—she’ll stow away in his plane and begin a new life wherever they land. Then she wakes up in a future that’s been ripped apart by earthquakes and floods; where vicious gangs rule the submerged city streets and a small group of intrepid travelers from across time are fighting against the odds to return things to normal. What Dorothy doesn’t know is that she could hold the key to unraveling the past—and her arrival may spell Ash’s ultimate destruction. (Goodreads)

I did a mini book review of this here.

3 Stars.

Okay so there you have all of the books that I read in March, how did your reading month go? What are you currently reading? Lets chat in the comments.

Happy Reading.

Thanks bookworms.

Mini Book Review: Stolen Times by Danielle Rollins

Hello Everyone.

Today I am going to do a book review of Stolen Time by Danielle Rollins. I did like this book, it wasn’t the best, but it was enjoyable.

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Seattle, 1913 // Dorothy is trapped. Forced into an engagement to a wealthy man just so she and her mother can live comfortably for the rest of their days, she’ll do anything to escape. Including sneaking away from her wedding and bolting into the woods to disappear.

New Seattle, 2077 // Ash is on a mission. Rescue the professor—his mentor who figured out the secret to time travel—so together they can put things right in their devastated city. But searching for one man means endless jumps through time with no guarantee of success.

When Dorothy collides with Ash, she sees it as her chance to start fresh—she’ll stow away in his plane and begin a new life wherever they land. Then she wakes up in a future that’s been ripped apart by earthquakes and floods; where vicious gangs rule the submerged city streets and a small group of intrepid travelers from across time are fighting against the odds to return things to normal. What Dorothy doesn’t know is that she could hold the key to unraveling the past—and her arrival may spell Ash’s ultimate destruction. (Goodreads)

When I first read the synopsis of this book I was really excited to read it. I mean a book with time travel is one of my favourite things. The story its self was really good, it was fast paced and the explanations of the times, places and the travel was excellent. The only problem I had was with the characters themselves.

The character Dorothy, in the beginning you learn she has been taught how to be a can artist by her mother, and she trusts nobody. Thats it, her character seemed to have no character growth for me, she needed to have more substance. Ash was better, but at the same time I felt he had no character growth as well. I’m sorry to say that they are pretty forgettable characters. Thats the only problem I had with this book.

The time travel aspect was really cool, I liked the science explanations and how it all made sense. It is a fun read, I just wanted more from the characters, I will read the next book to see if it expands anymore.

3.25 Stars

Happy Reading.

Thanks bookworms.

Goodreads Star Rating! Should we trust it??

Hello Everyone.

Today I want to talk about star rating on Goodreads. Many people have different ways of rating and honestly, should we trust the ratings on Goodreads? Some people give 3 stars to books they hate, some give 1 star. Its all subjective.

When I rate a book, I rate how the story is, how much it captured my interest and how the characters are developed. The only books I tend to have trouble rating are Middle grade books and Nonfiction. Anybody else have trouble rating some books???

So for example I recently read Wild by Cheryl Strayed and I enjoyed it, but I also it found it boring. When it came to giving it a Star rating, I just gave it 3 stars, because I found it was a book that I probably will never read again, and I just didn’t care for it that much. Yet some other people may have given it 3 stars because they enjoyed it and thought that it was okay. Now if I had never read it and I went into to Goodreads to see the ratings and the reviews, the ratings might have either put me off, or made me think I might like it.

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I am honestly having a hard time trusting the ratings on Goodreads. I have now decided that I am no longer looking at the ratings of the book, but I will read the reviews and the synopsis and if it catches my eye then I will read it myself and just rate the book for myself.

Now how I rate my books are:

1 Star = I absolutely did not like this book, didn’t like the plot, the characters, the themes ECT.

2 Star = I didn’t like the book, but it had some redeeming qualities, like a good character, a good ending. ECT.

3 Star = I liked the book, but I wont read it again.

4 Star = Really liked the book and enjoyed many aspects, but there was a tiny problem with it, the writing, the character, not liking what the character does. ECT.

5 Star = This is the best books, with finding no faults.

Hope everyone is having a good day? tell me what you think about star ratings?

Happy Reading.

Thanks bookworms.

Daisy Jones and The Six: Mini Book Review.

Hello everybody.

Today I am going to do a small review of a book, which in my opinion, is the best thing I ever read. Daisy Jones and The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid.

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Everyone knows Daisy Jones & The Six, but nobody knows the reason behind their split at the absolute height of their popularity . . . until now.

Daisy is a girl coming of age in L.A. in the late sixties, sneaking into clubs on the Sunset Strip, sleeping with rock stars, and dreaming of singing at the Whisky a Go Go. The sex and drugs are thrilling, but it’s the rock and roll she loves most. By the time she’s twenty, her voice is getting noticed, and she has the kind of heedless beauty that makes people do crazy things.

Also getting noticed is The Six, a band led by the brooding Billy Dunne. On the eve of their first tour, his girlfriend Camila finds out she’s pregnant, and with the pressure of impending fatherhood and fame, Billy goes a little wild on the road.

Daisy and Billy cross paths when a producer realizes that the key to supercharged success is to put the two together. What happens next will become the stuff of legend. (Goodreads) 

OH MY GOSH, this book means everything to me. Taylor is just a master at writing characters that you think are real. The 70s and 80s music scene is my favourite music, and I am just so sad that Daisy Jones and the Six isn’t a real band. Taylor has made me want to go out and buy their albums, she has made me want to buy all their posters, she has made me want to wear gold hoop earrings and bangles going up my arm. She has made me a fangirl for a fake band. I will just have to listen to Fleetwood Mac to get over it.

Daisy Jones is an amazing character, she is flawed, some people have said she is unlikeable, but I don’t think so. I think it is more of the fact that she is strong and she owns her mistakes, OMG the character growth is amazing. The Six are all really different, and the dynamics within the group are so odd.

The plot twists and turns are amazing, by the end I was a crying mess and my feelings were all over the place.

The format of the book is different, it is told in interview style, but please don’t let that out you off, it is such an interesting way to tell the story.  I highly recommend this book.

Goodreads: 5 stars.

Happy Reading.

Thanks Bookworms.

 

 

Book Review: The Wicker King by K. Ancrum

Hello Everybody!!

Today I am going to be doing a book review of The Wicker King by K. Ancrum.

I really loved this book, and I can’t wait to talk about it more.

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When August learns that his best friend, Jack, shows signs of degenerative hallucinatory disorder, he is determined to help Jack cope. Jack’s vivid and long-term visions take the form of an elaborate fantasy world layered over our own—a world ruled by the Wicker King. As Jack leads them on a quest to fulfill a dark prophecy in this alternate world, even August begins to question what is real or not. 

August and Jack struggle to keep afloat as they teeter between fantasy and their own emotions. In the end, each must choose his own truth. (Goodreads)

This book gave me so many emotions, I was all over the place, it was sad, depressing, and sometimes painful to read, but at the same time I really enjoyed it.

The way the book starts on white pages, and gets darker and darker with the mental health issues get worse within the book, I thought that this added to the story and made illness seem more intense.

August, bless him, he always looks after Jack and needs him in his life so much that he would do anything for him. Anything. Jack I’m still a bit confused about, I felt so sorry for him with the illness he suffered mostly. The fact the boys had basically no parental love, made them cling to each other. The feelings they had for each other were really intense and the way it was written made it seem as if the boys would die without the other. their relationship seemed really toxic but at the same time you routed for them.

The only thing I didn’t really like about it was the introduction of this girl character, which really didn’t add to the story much. She just seemed to be there.

I do recommend this book, but be warned it is a heavy book and deals with a load of difficult subjects.

Happy Reading.

Thanks Bookworms

NonFiction TBR 2019

Hello everybody.

Today I am going to show you the nonfiction books I plan to read in 2019. I’m hoping to read one every 2 months. All the synopsis’s will be from Goodreads.

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At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother’s death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life. With no experience or training, driven only by blind will, she would hike more than a thousand miles of the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State — and she would do it alone.
Told with suspense and style, sparkling with warmth and humor, Wild powerfully captures the terrors and pleasures of one young woman forging ahead against all odds on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.

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Shaun Bythell owns The Bookshop, Wigtown – Scotland’s largest second-hand bookshop. It contains 100,000 books, spread over a mile of shelving, with twisting corridors and roaring fires, and all set in a beautiful, rural town by the edge of the sea. A book-lover’s paradise? Well, almost … In these wry and hilarious diaries, Shaun provides an inside look at the trials and tribulations of life in the book trade, from struggles with eccentric customers to wrangles with his own staff, who include the ski-suit-wearing, bin-foraging Nicky. He takes us with him on buying trips to old estates and auction houses, recommends books (both lost classics and new discoveries), introduces us to the thrill of the unexpected find, and evokes the rhythms and charms of small-town life, always with a sharp and sympathetic eye.

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A celebrated writer’s irresistible, candid, and eloquent account of her pursuit of worldly pleasure, spiritual devotion, and what she really wanted out of life. 

Around the time Elizabeth Gilbert turned thirty, she went through an early-onslaught midlife crisis. She had everything an educated, ambitious American woman was supposed to want—a husband, a house, a successful career. But instead of feeling happy and fulfilled, she was consumed with panic, grief, and confusion. She went through a divorce, a crushing depression, another failed love, and the eradication of everything she ever thought she was supposed to be. 

To recover from all this, Gilbert took a radical step. In order to give herself the time and space to find out who she really was and what she really wanted, she got rid of her belongings, quit her job, and undertook a yearlong journey around the world—all alone. Eat, Pray, Love is the absorbing chronicle of that year. Her aim was to visit three places where she could examine one aspect of her own nature set against the backdrop of a culture that has traditionally done that one thing very well. In Rome, she studied the art of pleasure, learning to speak Italian and gaining the twenty-three happiest pounds of her life. India was for the art of devotion, and with the help of a native guru and a surprisingly wise cowboy from Texas, she embarked on four uninterrupted months of spiritual exploration. In Bali, she studied the art of balance between worldly enjoyment and divine transcendence. She became the pupil of an elderly medicine man and also fell in love the best way—unexpectedly. 

An intensely articulate and moving memoir of self-discovery, Eat, Pray, Love is about what can happen when you claim responsibility for your own contentment and stop trying to live in imitation of society’s ideals. It is certain to touch anyone who has ever woken up to the unrelenting need for change.

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Obsession, madness, memory, myth, and history combine to achieve a distinctive blend of nature writing and memoir from an outstanding literary innovator.

When Helen Macdonald’s father died suddenly on a London street, she was devastated. An experienced falconer—Helen had been captivated by hawks since childhood—she’d never before been tempted to train one of the most vicious predators, the goshawk. But in her grief, she saw that the goshawk’s fierce and feral temperament mirrored her own. Resolving to purchase and raise the deadly creature as a means to cope with her loss, she adopted Mabel, and turned to the guidance of The Once and Future King author T.H. White’s chronicle The Goshawk to begin her challenging endeavor. Projecting herself “in the hawk’s wild mind to tame her” tested the limits of Macdonald’s humanity and changed her life. 

Heart-wrenching and humorous, this book is an unflinching account of bereavement and a unique look at the magnetism of an extraordinary beast, with a parallel examination of a legendary writer’s eccentric falconry. Obsession, madness, memory, myth, and history combine to achieve a distinctive blend of nature writing and memoir from an outstanding literary innovator.

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On the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death, historian Lucy Worsley leads us into the rooms from which our best-loved novelist quietly changed the world.

This new telling of the story of Jane’s life shows us how and why she lived as she did, examining the places and spaces that mattered to her. It wasn’t all country houses and ballrooms, but a life that was often a painful struggle. Jane famously lived a ‘life without incident’, but with new research and insights, Lucy Worsley reveals a passionate woman who fought for her freedom. A woman who far from being a lonely spinster, in fact, had at least five marriage prospects, but who in the end refused to settle for anything less than Mr Darcy.

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Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches and sleeping with her “head-for-the-hills bag”. In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father’s junkyard.

Her father forbade hospitals, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. The family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent.

Then, lacking any formal education, Tara began to educate herself. She taught herself enough mathematics and grammar to be admitted to Brigham Young University, where she studied history, learning for the first time about important world events like the Holocaust and the civil rights movement. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.

Educated is an account of the struggle for self-invention. It is a tale of fierce family loyalty and of the grief that comes with severing the closest of ties. With the acute insight that distinguishes all great writers, Westover has crafted a universal coming-of-age story that gets to the heart of what an education is and what it offers: the perspective to see one’s life through new eyes and the will to change it. 

So this my Nonfiction TBR for 2019, wish me luck!

Happy Reading.

Thanks Bookworms.